Application of Simulation Technology in Football Training: A Systematic Review of Empirical Studies



Teng Jia1, Jirarat Sitthiworachart1, *, John Morris1
1 School of Industrial Education and Technology, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, 1 Soi Chalongkrung 1, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520, Thailand


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Creative Commons License
© 2024 The Author(s). Published by Bentham Open.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the School of Industrial Education and Technology, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, 1 Soi Chalongkrung 1, Ladkrabang, Bangkok 10520, Thailand; E-mail: jirarat.si@kmitl.ac.th


Abstract

Background

This review aimed to cover the characteristics and functions of simulation tools applied to football training, the process and results of empirical research, the benefits of simulation tools for football training, and existing challenges.

Materials and Methods

To investigate and analyze the effect of simulation technology in football training, the PRISMA method was used to systematically review 18 relevant empirical studies published between January, 2014 and July, 2023.

Results

The study identified three types of tools for applying simulation technology to football training, including head-mounted displays, Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE), and Screen-Based Simulation. These tools have been effective in training football playing techniques (including goalkeeping, heading, etc.) as well as football tactical skills (including perception-cognitive and decision-making) and can be used as a supplement to regular training.

Conclusion

If simulation technology is to enhance football training, we suggest that it is necessary to carefully verify the validity of the tool and the long-term impact of simulation training on participants and verify that simulation actually translates to real-world games. At the same time, it is suggested that future research could explore training with mixed VR and AR to develop more realistic and effective training platforms.

Keywords: Simulation, VR, Football training, Screen-based simulation, Cave, Sports.